The three dualities

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Greetings from Sankhu

Dear readers,

As I am currently reading a truly amazing commentary about the Gospel of Thomas, I would like to quote some paragraphs of that book. The book is called “The Nondual Teachings of Christ”. I will give further details about that (partly finished) book at the end of the quoted text. As spirituality, when it comes to teachings about nonduality or oneness, goes beyond religions, creeds, beliefs or rituals, and brings us to the highest commonalities shared by all mystics from all traditions, it does not really matter if teachings in this subject matter are originally from Jesus Christ or from the Upanishads. Here is a part of the commentary on the forty eighth saying:

There are different  dualities which exist that need to be penetrated, and they are often penetrated in sequence.

The first is the duality of value or aspect to things. We conceive of phenomena as good or evil, pure or impure, pleasant or painful. However, when we apply the principle of being a mere “passerby” to them, and do not make any conceptual elaborations about them, then comes the realization that there is no real purity or impurity, good or evil, etc. in phenomena at all, and they are of one taste and characteristic. Our thoughts of them do not define them or characterize them, and, as such, our thoughts are baseless and without merit. As this is seen, then all phenomena become clear in the sense that what they are is precisely unfathomable. When we do not think of things, or picture them to ourselves, then we see them as they are in terms of our experience. This is the first duality that is surmounted.

The second is the duality of subject and object. Paradoxically, one surmounts this by seeing a new, different “subject” behind the commonly perceived subject. Normally we perceive our sense of self to be identified with our mind, our wishes, our thoughts, etc. but these are all objects which occur in a more fundamental awareness. When we negate our mind and all its attendant phenomena, then we break through to the awareness in which this mind occurs. It is as if the former subject becomes an object of a new, deeper subject. This new “subject” has no sense of “I” or “mine” at all, but is like a clear, vast and empty presence in which all things live, move and have their being. Here we know ourselves to be the soul, and not the mind or body, and from this realization comes the first real breakthrough into the kingdom of God. We see that there can be a way out of ignorance, because we are not ignorance, inherently. We are awareness and awareness is the very definition of existence. The calm that comes from this truth is deep and joyful, but it is not the end, however.

The third is the duality between essential, nondual awareness and phenomena. Once the witnessing awareness is realized, we often begin to reify or solidify its difference and distinction from phenomena. Awareness is empty while phenomena are full; awareness is still while phenomena are in motion. By resting in this awareness more and more, however, such distinctions also begin to fall away and one realizes an unbroken unity to all things. It is not the same as conceiving of all things as consisting of primordial matter – as materialists and secularists do – nor is it like viewing all things as God’s creation. It is something inconceivable.

I think that the author has done a great job in skating around a subject matter that is beyond words. One should always remember that such texts are only pointers. Everybody has to inquire on his own in this subject matter to realize what has been described here.

About the Gospel of Thomas: “The Gospel of Thomas is perhaps one of the most enigmatic of religious scriptures. Yet it is also very likely that it is the earliest account of the teachings of Jesus, and therefore the most authentic record we have today as to what he truly taught. Therefore, to understand this Gospel is to get at the heart of what the historical Jesus said far beyond how he has been (mis)interpreted through the centuries and by later followers.”

The quote is from the e-Book “The Nondual Teachings of the Christ” from Charles Limcango. Please note that this book is still not finished and new volumes are published regularly. The latest (9th) has been published this month. He releases sets of 4 volumes in one book as the work gets done. So, books with volumes from 1-4 and 5-8 are already available.

4 responses »

  1. Hallo Jean-Claude,
    Ganz interessant!
    Ech hun just nët richteg verstanen op den Text vum Charles Limcango, deens du hei weiss, esou ähnlech och am Evangelium vum Thomas steet, oder ob ët dem Charles L. séing Interpretatioun vum Evangelium ass?
    An d’Photo ass Den Hummer 🙂
    LG
    René

    • Salut,
      Merci fir däin Kommentar. Den Charles Limcango ass amgaangen een Kommentar iwwert den Thomas-Evangelium ze schreiwen. Elo am Dezember huet hien d’Spréch 45 bis 50 an senger 9ter Ausgab iwwersat. Hien publizéiert déi dann regelméisseg op Amazon. Ech hunn mir eng englesch Iwwersetzung vum Thomas-Evangelium kaf an liesen dat dann dobäi, Sproch fir Sproch all Kéiers niewent dem Limcango sengem Kommentar. Et ass awer beandrockend wéi hien den Sënn vun den Spréch erklären ze weess, well dat Evangelium awer extrem kryptesch geschriwwen ass. Awer beim Liesen vum Kommentar liicht engem den Sënn dann gutt an. Dat do ass awer keen Auszuch aus dem Evangelium, dat ass een Deel vum Kommentar zum 48ten Sproch.
      Zur Foto…: Ech weess och net firwat ech déi hei um Blog nach net gewisen hunn. Se ass um Flickr awer hei passt jo tip top hin. Merci! 🙂
      Gréiss,
      JC

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