Unending Love by Rabindranath Tagore

Video

It has been a long time since I have posted my last message here. But I will continue to keep the Blog up and, from time to time post some thoughts or as today something I have worked on for some time. It is one of my favorite poems from Rabindranath Tagore. I have combined the spoken text with the Piano Concerto N° 5 from Beethoven. The image is a wallpaper image I downloaded from http://www.mrwallpaper.com. I have put subtitles to give the watcher an easy and joyful experience. I hope you like it.

Currently I am studying Vedanta scriptures, the Upanishads and more precisely the Advaita Vedanta. Reading does not bring enlightenment as we are already enlightened. It is through awareness and by giving attention to the experience of perception rather than to the object that is perceived that we will discover oneness, love… But these ancient texts, the Vedas, are of tremendous beauty if your heart is open. The Vedanta, or Upanishads, are the latest text of the Vedas. Vedanta is composed by the two words Veda and Anta. Anta means “the end”. Vedanta can be translated as the End of the Vedas. The Vedas are the most ancient texts known by mankind composed more than 5000 years ago by several sages over a period of time. The four Vedas talk a lot about rituals and ethics, the worldly religious knowledge, and as soon as self inquiry and self introspection comes into play we speak about the Vedanta. Advaita Vedanta speaks about non-duality and the most famous sage was Shankara, who commented and developed the Advaita Vedanta philosophy further. There is a lot more to say about these texts but the mere knowledge about them is not helpful. They are the finger that points to the moon. Some spend their lives analysing the finger, chewing and sucking on it and intellectualizing everything and the others simply look to where the finger is pointing… the moon.

Metta,

Shanti

11 responses »

  1. Hallo Jean-Claude.
    een herlecht Gedicht!
    an Du huess déi passend Musik an Photo eraus gesicht!
    Merci!
    René

  2. Pleased you are back posting, Unfortunately I could not get the video to play properly. Will try again when I am in another area. Kind regards Jean-Claude, we have the same initials Jack Caldwell.

    • Hi Jack,
      Indeed, sometimes Youtube is a bit slow depending on the time and the place you are. Sometimes it’s the server, some times it’s your bandwidth. Thanks for passing by. I still regularly read your posts as I get them by mail. Unfortunately I neglect a little bit my presence here but I try to be back more regularly. And yes… 🙂 both of us JC’s… so far geographically but so close in our way of perceiving life…

  3. Thank you for sharing Tagore, I read him alot in India. It amazes me how much deeper the resonance of art when experience in the place of its origin. I read the words in the UK but remember them sounding different in Calcutta. India is a land like no other and Tagore seemed to understand the mystery. Namaste brother.

    • Thank you very much. It is true that the words of Tagore get a different resonance when you have been in India and got closer into touch with their cultural and spiritual heritage.

  4. This time the video played for me and I have to let you know I enjoyed it immensely so did Pauline. The joy you create makes me appreciate how lucky I am. Yes we do perceive life similarly but you have studied much more and have deeper understanding, I am fortunate you share your knowledge. Time is precious we can only do so much. Thank you Jean Claude.

    • Thank you very much for this beautiful comment. I am very happy that you have enjoyed the video. It took me some time to find and assemble the parts (spoken word, music and image) that I needed to compose it. It is one of my preferred poems from Tagore.
      And I agree with you. We definitvely share the same views on many subjects… I would even say on almost everything and I am glad that the Internet made it possible that we can share and communicate together.
      Jean-Claude

Share your Thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s